General Information

The art of horseshoeing takes time, patience, and practice to develop trimming, horseshoeing, and forging skills. It also takes someone in good physical health.


  •  Physical examination before attending
  • A current Tetanus vaccination
  • Bring bedding, pillow, food, special cooking utensils (a few basic ones provided), and toiletries

What to expect?

  • Class is conducted Monday – Friday from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm
  • Lunch can be packed or purchased in a town a few miles away or on the way home from farms
  • Homework may consist of bookwork and/or forging exercises
  • Instructor is available to answer questions outside of class hours
  • The shop is open evenings and weekends for students to practice

Tuition & Fees

  • The tuition for each course is all inclusive.
  • There are no extra fees or hidden charges incurred during the course.
  •  Tools will be provided for the student to use while enrolled at the school.
  • A textbook will be available for each student.
  • If a student prefers, they can purchase their own textbook.
  • Free housing will be provided on the grounds where the school is located for the student to use while at the school and includes a kitchen and laundry area.
  • Meals, bedding, and toiletries are not provided.
Troy demonstrating shoe modifications at Michiana Equine Event
Troy lecturing at Purdue University’s farrier short course
Troy teaching a veterinary student during the farrier short course
Troy teaching a student at the anvil
Troy teaching a veterinary student how to nail a shoe on
Troy as clinician at D.L. Schwartz’s open house
Troy giving a clinic at D.L. Schwartz’s open house
Front Agricultural Draft Horseshoe made by Edward Martin
Shoe Board made by Troy Price for Danny Ward
Troy judging a back foot at a contest